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Lawn Care Blog

The 5 MUST HAVE Spring Lawn Care Beauty Tips: Pageant Edition

lawn care beauty crownAs I watched this weekend's Miss America pageant with my wife, we discussed her rigorous beauty regiments when she competed in the system.  It stunned me to hear about all the work that goes into it, and that it takes a extreme level of preparedness to look your best for these competitions.  

I couldn't help but think to myself that it's a lot like lawn care.  Yeah, you can appreciate how beautiful a lush green lawn is, but you may never know the work that goes into getting it prepared to look it's best.  Well of course you'll want to invest in a proper lawn care program; however there are definitely some things that you as a homeowner can do to help get your lawn looking it's best sooner, rather than later. So in honor of this weekend's pageant, I decided today's blog would outline 5 things you can do to get your lawn it's best.

  1. Repairing Winter Damage - Salt and snowplows can cause some serious damage that you may not be aware of until the snow melts.  Salt damage is caused by the sodium in the product burning your lawn, and plows can scalp the lawn running along your driveways.  Early spring is the perfect time to get out there and repair the damage before the growing season begins.  
  2. Spring Aeration & Overseeding - Along with repairing any damage caused by plowing or salt burns, look for any other areas in your lawn that were struggling last year.  It may be a good idea to perform a lawn aeration and overseed afterwards.  This will allow for early germination, while allowing you to still get a crabgrass preventer down later in the spring before crabgrass begins to germinate.
  3. Rake Compacted Leaves & Snow Mold - After the last of the snow melts this spring as temperatures rise, it's a good idea to get out there and lightly rake out areas that have leaves and other debris on them.  These areas may be choked out by the debris, causing dead spots in your lawn. Additionally, be on the lookout for snow mold.  This fungus grows in your lawn when snow covers your turf for a long period of time.  While a fungicide can kill the problem immediately, the same results can usually be achieved by likely raking the fungus allowing air to penetrate and dry it up.  
  4. Don't Roll It! - Perhaps one of the most common things that people do to their lawn in the spring is to roll it thinking that they are providing a beneficial service to their lawn.  Little do they know that rolling their lawn is bad, often crushing the crown of newly growing turf plants causing damage or even death.  Compaction is another problem that comes with rolling your lawn.  Lawn care companies all over Ohio perform aerations to help alleviate compaction, delivering important oxygen to your turf's root systems, only to have that process reversed by some homeowner rolling their lawn.
  5. Tune Up that Mower & Mow a 1/2" Shorter that First Mow - Dull blades can rip, instead of cutting your grass.  Ripped blades are more prone to yellowing, in addition to becoming vulnerable to disease and insects.  Sharp blades cut cleanly, promoting healthy growth.  Also, make sure to cut about a 1/2" lower and catch your clippings.  This will help remove any debris that you missed raking, and also cut out any fungus remnants left over from the previous year. You can also check out THESE additional spring mowing tips.
Need More Spring Tips?  
Ensuring that your lawn looks great in the spring can seem like a daunting challenge.  However, Weed Pro has you covered with our Spring Lawn Care Guide that lays out everything you need to do to get your lawn looking great this spring.  It's yours to download for FREE by clicking on the button below!
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Shaun Kanary 
has been a part of the Green Industry for the past 15 years. As the Director of Marketing for Weed Pro Lawn Care, a Cleveland and Columbus Lawn Care Service Provider, Shaun is a regular contributor to the Weed Pro Blog, and other industry magazine and blogs. 

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